Jumping on Entrepreneurship

Parkour, Startups, and Travel

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5 Cool Things Zac Has Done

[caption id="" align="alignleft" width="200" caption="Colony Manor Townhouses"][/caption]5. Challenged Housing Department to get our basements back:

Housing is more or less constantly trying to pull a fast one on RIT students. They often get away with it, but sometimes they just take things too far. Here's the story of how Housing tried to lock the basements of all the townhouses in my complex, and how I started a movement and stopped them by using social networking and a the power of rallying people behind a cause!

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="200" caption="No Food for 72 Hours"][/caption]4. 72 Hour Fast:

I grew up in an upper-middle class family with a fully stocked refrigerator. Sometimes we were out of peanut butter, but we were never out of food. So I decided to find out what it was like to go three days without eating. I did not alter my schedule at all, and I used Twitter to keep a constant log of how I was feeling.

[caption id="" align="alignleft" width="200" caption="Zac's Parkour Journey Across The Country"][/caption]3. Trip around the country:

Adriana Gascoigne, founder of Girls In Tech quick interview at LAUNCH

On DROdio

I caught up with Adriana Gascoigne, the founder of Girls in Tech, at the LAUNCH conference in San Francisco.

Adriana has a great story about her reasons behind starting Girls in Tech.  Several years ago she was the only female employee in a startup with 50 employees and decided "that was a problem."

She created Girls in Tech in 2007, a "social network enterprise focused on the engagement, education and empowerment of like-minded, professional, intelligent and influential women in technology."  The organization now has 57 chapters worldwide (including NYC, China, and Paris) and has had heavyweight speakers like Twitter CEO Evan Williams at Kicklabs last Sept, and an upcoming session with Dennis Crowley of Foursquare in April.  I asked her why she named it "Girls" vs. "Women" in Tech and she said it was because "it's more fun" and lighthearted.  The good news for men:  Yes, you are allowed to attend.

Here's the quick 5 minute interview with Adriana:

I caught up with Adriana Gascoigne, the founder of Girls in Tech, at the LAUNCH conference in San Francisco. Adriana has a great story about her reasons behind starting Girls in Tech.  Several years ago she was the only female employee in a startup with 50 employees and decided "that was a problem." She created Girls in Tech in 2007, a "social network enterprise focused on the engagement, education and empowerment of like-minded, professional, intelligent and influential women in technology."  The organization now has 57 chapters worldwide (including NYC, China, and Paris) and has had heavyweight speakers like Twitter CEO Evan Williams at Kicklabs last Sept, and an upcoming session with Dennis Crowley of Foursquare in April.  I asked her why she named it "Girls" vs. "Women" in Tech and she said it was because "it's more fun" and lighthearted.  The good news for men:  Yes, you are allowed to attend. Here's the quick 5 minute interview with Adriana:

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