Jumping on Entrepreneurship

Parkour, Startups, and Travel

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Madison, Wisconsin

I'm going to start posting a story from most of the places I visit. I'm going to start out with Madison, Wisconsin:

Alissa (Muse_of_Fire) and I were in the car, driving to a daycamp for pre-teen boys and girls in Madison. This was the first day we were working with Girls, Inc (the group that runs this camp), and we had absolutely no idea what to expect. We didn't know whether we'd be working with boys, girls, or both. We didn't know what kind of facilities we had to work with, or how many people we'd have to work with.

The night before, Alissa, Chad (her training partner), and I had dinner and planned out what we were going to do the next day. It took about two hours, and due to The Game (if you say certain words, you have to do 10 pushups), there were pretty constant distractions - but we finally worked out a rough lesson plan. We would start with a Julie Angel video, give a brief talk about Parkour, then, boys or girls, we were going to focus heavily on games.

We pull up to the driveway and get out of the car. We examine the Kennedy Heights Community Center, it's pretty much just a big temp building. There's a wooden fence outside for balancing, and a playground around the back. The director of the camp came out to meet us, introduced us to the girls, and we were on our own! There were eight girls, I'd say age 12 to 14. Long story short, they were not impressed by our pep talk, or by the Julie Angel video. Looking back, we probably needed something a bit more action oriented.

Once we got them outside though, we started to play some warmup games. Alissa started by having them all run in place, and then drop into the landing position whenever she said drop. We did some side QM, and did some other fun warmup activities. We wanted to start off with a game, so I ran a game of QM Redlight/Greenlight. Went to the fence to do some partner balancing drills, and then we played a balance game. Two people would stand about arms length apart, and try to push each other over without moving their feet. The first person who's feet moved, lost. We then played a finger jousting game, and then I taught precisions.

What Has Become of the NCAA?

On Imported Blog

Over Christmas break, I watched all of Blue Mountain State on Netflix. It's a raunchy comedy aimed at young men centered around college football players at a stereotypical big state school. It's a hilarious TV show that I would recommend for anyone who enjoys inappropriate and perhaps offensive humor (guilty pleasure, sorry).

During the end of the third and final season, the NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) hits the school with huge penalties for its program. In retaliation, Alex Moran (starting quarterback and main character) fires back by attempting to expose the NCAA and how unfair they are to student-athletes.

Currently, there is a lot of debate going around the amateur status of college athletes, mainly football and basketball players. Football and basketball games are huge sources of revenue for most universities, generating millions of dollars for their programs (the University of Texas generated more than $100 million of revenue in 2011 - 2012).

The athletes don't see any of this, at least not legally. They aren't allowed any compensation besides the scholarships they receive along with perhaps a small living stipend. They aren't allowed to accept free materials (not even cream cheese!). Athletes have often professional-like schedules where their days are packed with practice, training, and film review. Recently, they have started to come together because they believe they should be paid as they are generating tons of revenue for their respective universities.

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